Author Topic: Sculpey?  (Read 4459 times)

Offline Darth Doomy-Doom

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Sculpey?
« on: January 28, 2009, 11:43:58 PM »
I finally got some Sculpey and I'm eager to try my hand at some rudimentary sculpting.  But first, just a couple of questions. 

To cure it, it needs to bake.  I've also heard that you can just boil it, for some of the smaller parts.  Is this reliable?  Will boiling affect the paint (factory or custom)?

Also, if I do bake it, is the plastic going to be ok?  I've got a vehicle and a playset in the works that are too big to boil; they're made of different plastic from the figures and I'm more than a little concerned about fumes and outright melting the piece.  For that matter, the same concerns apply to the figures.

So...help me out guys.  Any and all advice is appreciated.

Offline tykrazen

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Re: Sculpey?
« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2009, 02:14:28 PM »
Baking Plastic = Bad.

If you are applying sculpey to plastic boil or a hair dryer is your best option...

Offline Darth Doomy-Doom

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Re: Sculpey?
« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2009, 07:58:53 PM »
Yeah, that's what I figured.

Hadn't thought of a hair dryer, though.  I think that'll work out alright.  Thanks.

Offline jokabofe

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Re: Sculpey?
« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2009, 11:58:24 PM »
Will boiling affect the paint (factory or custom)?

Boiling is - or should I say was - my preferred method for curing sculpey. It will not harm factory paint 99% of the time. There were a few instances where I noticed some slight discoloration on boiled pieces, but I think it may have been 1 at most. Custom paint is a totally different story. If you're smart, you use acrylic paint for customizing. Acrylic paint sticks nicely to little plastic men. Unfortunately, acrylic paint is water based, meaning that you clean your brushes and your hands with water to remove the paint. Therefore dunking a freshly painted figure into a cup of boiling water is a huge no-no.

Two options:

First - and most desirable - do all your sculpey work before painting, this way you won't have to worry about it.

Second, when that's not possible - place your figure into a plastic ziplock baggie. Zip it up and place in boiling water. All of the heat but none of the wet.

Personally, I switched to Fixit sculpt a few years back, and it's the greatest thing since sliced bread. A 2 part epoxy that you mix as you need it. Cures in about 4 hours. No boiling, baking, heating, melting, or anything else needed. Just air.


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Offline Incom

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Re: Sculpey?
« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2009, 06:57:57 AM »
Yeah, I tried sculpey III once, but switched to Fixit Sculpt and like Jokabofe said, it's one of the best products for us customizers.

Especially for filling gaps and such on ships and vehicles, I'd definitely go with a 2-part epoxy putty.

Offline jokabofe

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Re: Sculpey?
« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2009, 10:21:58 AM »
Especially for filling gaps and such on ships and vehicles, I'd definitely go with a 2-part epoxy putty.

Actually, for filling in small gaps, cuts, airbubbles and such, I use a product called Mr. Disolved Putty. It's a liquid epoxy that cures once applied. It's great for small jobs like that.



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Offline Incom

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Re: Sculpey?
« Reply #6 on: February 06, 2009, 12:30:22 PM »
You gotta give it to those Japanese fellas: they have a solution for everything!

Offline babyjawa

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Re: Sculpey?
« Reply #7 on: March 23, 2009, 03:01:07 PM »
I'd like to warn you about using a hair dryer if you decide to use one. It doesn't harden the sculpey all the way. It usually only hardens the surface of it. It can still be malformed afterward. No matter how long you use a hair dryer, it won't cure the whole thing because it will burn the surface before that can happen.

Good luck!

cuyvaldar

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Re: Sculpey?
« Reply #8 on: March 23, 2009, 06:32:11 PM »
Personally I wouldn't use sculpie for anything, but that is my opinion.

A way I have used in the past to cure sculpie is to use a work or desk lamp/light with a 60 watt bulb in it.

Place figure into a 6 to 7 inch tall clay coffee or coco mug.
Then place light just above mug, leaving a small gap above the lip of the mug, so that air and heat can flow.

About 10 to 15 minutes and the application should be finished.

This basically becomes a kiln of sorts, but a lot smaller.

It works really well with kneadatite as well, and also works really well with heating figures to get them apart.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2009, 06:33:10 PM by cuyvaldar »