Author Topic: Joint Painting Tips  (Read 2718 times)

Offline Darth Instigator

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Joint Painting Tips
« on: September 10, 2008, 04:19:18 PM »
         Would anyone know how to paint on the joints without the paint getting torn up when you bend the arm or leg? I've painted a few figures and whenever I paint on the joints, wait for the paint to dry for an hour, and then bend the arm or leg the other way and then backdown to where it started, all the paint that was on the joint has gotten torn to shreds. Like I said before, does anyone know how to paint it and make the paint actually stay on.
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Offline Darth Instigator

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Re: Joint Painting Tips
« Reply #1 on: September 10, 2008, 04:22:19 PM »
Now that I think about it, I think I should've put this under the "Tools, Tips & Techniques" section.
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Offline CHEWIE34

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Re: Joint Painting Tips
« Reply #2 on: September 10, 2008, 08:48:56 PM »
You know, this is never easy to do. 

- I'd say first, look at the joint and determine if when you move the joint back and forth, if the plastic rubs at all.  If it does, you already know that if you don't take some preparations, the paint is going to chip off.

- So, what can you do about this? There's a few options...

1) Don't paint the actual joint.

2) After you paint the joint, use super glue (liquid kind) and glue the joint, but only the part where paint would rub.  Essentially you still have some articulation, just not ball-joint quality.  But it will keep the paint on (after the glue dries, paint over the glue).

3) Trim the plastic around the joint with and exacto knife (so the joint doesn't rub), and then paint. 

4) Sand down the actual joint itself, then paint.


I usually go with option (3).

In doing so, after I trim around the plastic, and try to smooth out the areas that I trimmed, I paint the joint.  After painting, I take a toothpick and apply liquid super glue over the areas that would rub if the joint had not been trimmed, but I'm careful to not let the glue leak to areas where it would restrict articulation.  After the glue dries, I repaint over those areas in an attempt to make it look seemless and natural (this is also a good practice when repainting palms of hands of figurs due to holding weapons making the paint chip).  Also, make sure you are painting in VERY thin layers.

Hopefully that helps a bit!

 ;)


Offline Darth Instigator

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Re: Joint Painting Tips
« Reply #3 on: September 11, 2008, 03:58:33 PM »
Thanks.
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Offline Darth Doomy-Doom

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Re: Joint Painting Tips
« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2008, 09:38:15 PM »
....I was just going to recommend dye.

Looks like Chewie's got a bit more know-how, though.

Offline kkvolution

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Re: Joint Painting Tips
« Reply #5 on: October 05, 2008, 06:13:59 AM »
I like to suggest something.

Use those nail polish, the clear type. It is used to coat the second layer on the nails after the actual colored nail polish is applied and dried. It better than super glue actually. Try it. :)

You know, this is never easy to do. 

- I'd say first, look at the joint and determine if when you move the joint back and forth, if the plastic rubs at all.  If it does, you already know that if you don't take some preparations, the paint is going to chip off.

- So, what can you do about this? There's a few options...

1) Don't paint the actual joint.

2) After you paint the joint, use super glue (liquid kind) and glue the joint, but only the part where paint would rub.  Essentially you still have some articulation, just not ball-joint quality.  But it will keep the paint on (after the glue dries, paint over the glue).

3) Trim the plastic around the joint with and exacto knife (so the joint doesn't rub), and then paint. 

4) Sand down the actual joint itself, then paint.


I usually go with option (3).

In doing so, after I trim around the plastic, and try to smooth out the areas that I trimmed, I paint the joint.  After painting, I take a toothpick and apply liquid super glue over the areas that would rub if the joint had not been trimmed, but I'm careful to not let the glue leak to areas where it would restrict articulation.  After the glue dries, I repaint over those areas in an attempt to make it look seemless and natural (this is also a good practice when repainting palms of hands of figurs due to holding weapons making the paint chip).  Also, make sure you are painting in VERY thin layers.

Hopefully that helps a bit!

 ;)


In my experience, there's no such thing as luck.